The motive for austro hungarian expansion on the balkan peninsula

At the Congress of Vienna, important business took place informally at banquets and balls.

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Cubrilovic too did nothing, afraid of shooting Duchess Sophie by accident. Was a war inevitable after the murder, or did policy-makers let the crisis escape their control? The Struggle for Mastery in Europe, — The fact is that, if we look at the matter dispassionately and in a purely objective spirit, we shall find that there really was a hopeless incompatibility between the ideals, aims, policies, and interests of the Servians and the Serb race and those of the Austrians and Hungarians.

First, why did the crisis led to a war between Austria and Serbia? AfterPasic knew that Apis' clique would kill to get their way.

History of the Balkans

Iron Age[ edit ] After the period that followed the arrival of the Dorians, known as the Greek Dark Ages or the Geometric Periodthe classical Greek culture developed in the southern Balkan peninsula, the Aegean islands and the western Asia Minor Greek colonies starting around the 9th or 8th century BC and peaking with the democracy that developed in 6th and 5th century BC Athens.

The purpose of the murder itself The murder itself was hardly a mystery. Ultimately, diplomacy of the old style failed in when new forces such as nationalism and militarism escaped its control.

There was no irresistable outburst of popular anger after the assassination: The racial and national aspirations already astir among the South Slavs of the Dual Monarchy were quickened and intensified by the great victories won by their Servian brethren over both Turks and Bulgarians and by the spectacle of the territorial aggrandizement which accrued from those victories to the independent Kingdom of Servia.

Plans to diminish or partition Ottoman Turkey revolved around the independence of ethnic minorities: Austria At one time Austria had been the main threat to Ottoman rule, but after there were few actual territorial transfers to the Habsburgs.

Apologists for the "old diplomacy" point to its positive features: The central issue in Balkan diplomacy at this time was the Eastern Question. In general, British capitalists tried to take as much profit out of Turkey as possible, without fatally weakening the country and killing the golden goose.

Neither side considered the chance that the war would spread across Europe. Subsequently, Christian colonists, soldiers and slaves came to Dacia and spread Christianity. The Russians wanted to compensate for their setback in the Bosnian Crisis of — by establishing a pro-Russian Balkan alliance intended to impede any further Austro-Hungarian advances in the region.

By September this loose confederation, the Balkan League, was ready to achieve its goals. On the day of the attack, Princip heard Cabrinovic's bomb go off and assumed that the Archduke was dead. In this way, the states of Bulgaria, Greece, Montenegro, and Serbia sought to emulate the nineteenth-century nationalist successes of Germany and Italy.

After liberating Slavic populations under Turkish rule, the next logical goal for the Serbs would be to unite with their kinsmen in Montenegro and free the Slavs of Austria-Hungary. However, the Roman influence failed to dissolve Greek culture, which maintained a predominant status in the Eastern half of the Empire, and of course continued to be strong in the southern half of the Balkans.

Another profound consequence of Serbian expansion was that it threatened the stability of Austro-Hungary.

The council finalized the demands on July 19th and sent them to Belgrade on the 23rd. The modern group of Great Powers had not yet formed at that time Poland and Venice were still major forces.

This split had to be negotiated every decade. The Serbs, victorious in both Balkan Wars, were the main beneficiary; their nation almost doubled in size with the acquisition of Kosovo and parts of Macedonia and Albania. Policies crafted for such reasons often failed to address the real, local causes of the repeated Balkan crises which took up so much of Europe's attention in these years.Austro-Hungarian Slavs included Poles, Ukrainians, Czechs, Slovenes, Serbs, Croats, and Slavonized Bulgars.

Nationalism in the Balkan Peninsula was seen as the beginning of the potential breakup of both the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires.

Apr 21,  · Also, who was the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and who was Czar Nicholas II? Please don't correct my grammar. Answer the question. Why was the WWI Crisis in the Balkans important? Also, who was the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and who was Czar Nicholas II? Prior to WWI the Balkan Peninsula was comprised, much as Status: Resolved.

The transit from Austrian Empire/ HRE/ Hapsburg Empire nomenclature to Austro-Hungarian empire in was due to the loss of yet another war- Austro-Prussian War - Wikipedia, to Prussia/Germany. opportunity for intellectual elites of the Balkan peoples to process projects for a greater Greece, greater Serbia, greater Bulgaria, etc.

The Great Powers, by exploiting the ethno-nationalistic ideas of local elites in accordance with their geopolitical, religious and other. Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that Currency: Gulden (to ), Krone (–).

History of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that existed from Government: Constitutional monarchy, Liberal autocracy, Personal union (through dual monarchy).

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The motive for austro hungarian expansion on the balkan peninsula
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